Dijon travel guide

Dijon Tourism | Dijon Guide

You're Going to Love Dijon

A center for culture and business in the Burgundy region of France, Dijon is famous for its mustard, its wines, and its sense of fashion. There are world-class museums to explore, along with unparalleled shopping spots, and hiking trails for outdoor enthusiasts.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Dijon

1. Beautiful History

Dijon is a treasure trove of splendid architecture in a variety of styles, from medieval to high Renaissance, including the Palais des Ducs et des États de Bourgogne, dating from 1686 and once the seat of Burgundy's dukes, and the Église Notre Dame.

2. Cuisine to Die For

From the classic Dijon mustard to a world-class dining scene, there is much to be savored and tasted in this culinary capital.

3. Enjoy Parks and Gardens

The city is home to many gorgeous parks such as the Jardin Darcy, or Parc de la Combe à la Serpent, where you can enjoy the greenery and flowers in season.

4. Fruits of the Vine

The Burgundy region is justly recognized for its flavorful reds, and you'll be able to explore the area's wineries as well as the bottled product.

5. Great Shopping

Dijon is a very fashionable city, and you'll find a wide range of boutiques from more everyday brands to luxury labels like Chanel and Givenchy.

What to do in Dijon

1. Home Of The Grand Dukes

An impressive Neoclassical structure dating back to 1364, the Palais des Ducs et des États de Bourgogne, which houses Dijon's town hall and the Musée des Beaux-Arts, once served as the home of the Grand Dukes of the West. Although not all rooms are open to the public, the Tour de Philippe le Bon offers breathtaking views of the Dijon valley and the Saone river, as well as the surrounding hills and vineyards. Visitors can also enjoy the 170 foot Tour de Bar and the palace kitchen, which maintains its magnificent fiINSERT IGNOREs.

2. Lessons In Art History

Located within the Palais des Ducs, the Musée des Beaux-Arts, which houses the carved tombs of dukes John the Fearless and Philip the Bold, was founded in 1787. The museum features an extensive collection of Egyptian, Medieval and Renaissance art, including masterworks by Lotto, Manet, Monet, Matisse and Rodin, as well as modern animal sculptures by François Pompon and mid-century works from the school of Paris by Charles Lapicque, Vieira da Silva and Nicolas de Staël. The gallery also showcases Islamic ceramics and glasses, Oriental weapons and caskets, African ivories and masks, Asian porcelain and Tibetan and Indian sculptures.

3. 13Th Century Sanctuary

Begun in 1230, the Église Notre Dame of Dijon, a Roman Catholic Church regarded as a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, is located in the heart of the city near the Palais des Ducs. The church boasts a statue of Notre-Dame de Bon-Espoir, also known as the Black Madonna, who is said to have protected the citizens of Dijon from foreign invaders. Other features include the chapel of the Assumption, the sacristy, and the gallery, which contains five original 13th century stained-glass windows, representing the lives of Saint Peter and Saint Andrew.

4. Life In Old Burgundy

Set in a Cistercian convent dating back to the 17th century, the Musée de la Vie Bourguignonne is an ethnological museum that hosts a collection curated by Perrin de Puycousin. Among the items featured are furniture, utensils, costumes and artifacts from 19th century Burgundy. The top floor of the gallery showcases a reproduction of a Dijon street, while the first floor recreates a number of classic city shops, including a pharmacy, a greengrocer, a furrier, a toy shop, a hat-maker and a clockmaker, among others.

5. Reimagined Classic Cuisine

One of Dijon's most treasured buildings, the Maison des Cariatides, which dates back to the 17th century, now houses one of the city's finest restaurants. Headed by chef Chef Thomas Collomb, who was trained by René Villard at the Château de Bourgogne, the eatery serves modern cuisine with a traditional touch. Highlights include the tuna loin with quinoa and peppers, the farm-raised pork loin with aubergine pulp, confit of girolle mushrooms and tomatoes, and the chocolat Manjari with a fleur de sel and Madagascan vanilla-flavored sablé biscuit.

1. Home Of The Grand Dukes

An impressive Neoclassical structure dating back to 1364, the Palais des Ducs et des États de Bourgogne, which houses Dijon's town hall and the Musée des Beaux-Arts, once served as the home of the Grand Dukes of the West. Although not all rooms are open to the public, the Tour de Philippe le Bon offers breathtaking views of the Dijon valley and the Saone river, as well as the surrounding hills and vineyards. Visitors can also enjoy the 170 foot Tour de Bar and the palace kitchen, which maintains its magnificent fiINSERT IGNOREs.

2. Lessons In Art History

Located within the Palais des Ducs, the Musée des Beaux-Arts, which houses the carved tombs of dukes John the Fearless and Philip the Bold, was founded in 1787. The museum features an extensive collection of Egyptian, Medieval and Renaissance art, including masterworks by Lotto, Manet, Monet, Matisse and Rodin, as well as modern animal sculptures by François Pompon and mid-century works from the school of Paris by Charles Lapicque, Vieira da Silva and Nicolas de Staël. The gallery also showcases Islamic ceramics and glasses, Oriental weapons and caskets, African ivories and masks, Asian porcelain and Tibetan and Indian sculptures.

3. 13Th Century Sanctuary

Begun in 1230, the Église Notre Dame of Dijon, a Roman Catholic Church regarded as a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, is located in the heart of the city near the Palais des Ducs. The church boasts a statue of Notre-Dame de Bon-Espoir, also known as the Black Madonna, who is said to have protected the citizens of Dijon from foreign invaders. Other features include the chapel of the Assumption, the sacristy, and the gallery, which contains five original 13th century stained-glass windows, representing the lives of Saint Peter and Saint Andrew.

4. Life In Old Burgundy

Set in a Cistercian convent dating back to the 17th century, the Musée de la Vie Bourguignonne is an ethnological museum that hosts a collection curated by Perrin de Puycousin. Among the items featured are furniture, utensils, costumes and artifacts from 19th century Burgundy. The top floor of the gallery showcases a reproduction of a Dijon street, while the first floor recreates a number of classic city shops, including a pharmacy, a greengrocer, a furrier, a toy shop, a hat-maker and a clockmaker, among others.

5. Reimagined Classic Cuisine

One of Dijon's most treasured buildings, the Maison des Cariatides, which dates back to the 17th century, now houses one of the city's finest restaurants. Headed by chef Chef Thomas Collomb, who was trained by René Villard at the Château de Bourgogne, the eatery serves modern cuisine with a traditional touch. Highlights include the tuna loin with quinoa and peppers, the farm-raised pork loin with aubergine pulp, confit of girolle mushrooms and tomatoes, and the chocolat Manjari with a fleur de sel and Madagascan vanilla-flavored sablé biscuit.

Where to Eat in Dijon

Savor classic Burgundian cuisine in the small, intimate Chez le Bougnat, where main dishes start at EUR10.50. Dress up for the upscale La Dame d'Aquitaine, where you'll listen to classical music and dine on fine Dijonnais cuisine starting at EUR37.

When to visit Dijon

Dijon in February
Estimated hotel price
C$ 112
1 night at 3-star hotel
Dijon in February
Estimated hotel price
C$ 112
1 night at 3-star hotel

Most visitors arrive in Dijon during the warmer months, from April to November, with a spike in the late fall during the wine harvesting season.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
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How to Get to Dijon

Plane

The nearest airport to Dijon is the Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG) at a distance of 215 miles. There is regular high-speed train service via TGV that costs EUR17.

Train

Trains, including Eurostar and high-speed rail service, connect Dijon to Paris, most major centers in France, and many other European destinations.

Car

Dijon connects to Paris via the A6 highway, and to Strasburg in Germany via the A36. Other routes connect to Luxemburg, Belgium, and Switzerland.

Bus

Eurolines connects Dijon to many centers in France and throughout Europe.

Airports near Dijon

Airlines serving Dijon

Ryanair
Good (1,827 reviews)
Air Corsica
Excellent (22 reviews)

Where to stay in Dijon

City Center - this is where you will find charming streets lined with medieval buildings, many with the area's multicolored roofs, along with attractions like the Tour Philippe le Bon, a 15th-century tower that offers stunning views of the city and countryside.

Popular Neighborhoods in Dijon

Faubourg North - this area just north of the city center is where you'll find the train station along with many hotels like the Hôtel Montigny and Kyriad Dijon Gare.

Jouvence - this modern neighborhood is largely residential, with some accommodation options and a dining scene where you'll bump shoulders with locals.

Where to stay in popular areas of Dijon

Most booked hotels in Dijon

Grand Hotel La Cloche Dijon - MGallery
Excellent (8.4, Excellent reviews)
C$ 243+
Odalys City Dijon Les Cordeliers
Excellent (8, Excellent reviews)
C$ 87+
Holiday Inn Dijon
Good (7.9, Good reviews)
C$ 152+
Campanile Dijon Centre - Gare
Good (6.8, Good reviews)
C$ 90+
Premiere Classe Dijon Nord
Good (6.8, Good reviews)
C$ 63+
hotelF1 Dijon nord
Good (6.3, Good reviews)
C$ 52+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Dijon

Public Transportation

Dijon is served by both buses and trams in an extensive network, with fares starting at EUR1.30. A 48-hour ticket costs EUR6.85 and a 72-hour pass EUR8.80.

Taxi

Taxis are plentiful in the city, with fares that start at EUR2 with a minimum charge of EUR7.

Car

There are many one-way streets in Dijon that tend to confuse visitors, and parking can be at a premium. A car rental, however, is ideal for exploring the area, and you can rent from Sixt or Enterprise, with prices starting at EUR95.

The Cost of Living in Dijon

Shopping Streets

Pedestrianized Rue de la Liberté is the place to find small shops and boutiques along with national brands for everything from fashions to wine and spirits.

Groceries and Other

Carrefour and E.Leclerc offer a good range of products and prices, with Leader Price Express a good alternative for quick shopping. A quart of milk costs about EUR0.95 and a dozen eggs EUR2.60.

Cheap meal
C$ 18.74
A pair of jeans
C$ 120.10
Single public transport ticket
C$ 1.88
Cappuccino
C$ 3.44