Trenton travel guide

Trenton Tourism | Trenton Guide

You're Going to Love Trenton

Trenton is the capital of New Jersey and the only capital that borders another state. When you plan your vacation, include a boat ride on the Delaware River and explore the roots of Trenton's history. Trenton lies between New York City and Philadelphia, and both states have attributed immensely to the growth of the city's local culture.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Trenton

1. Arm & Hammer Park

The Arm & Hammer Park is home to the stadium of the Trenton Thunder, a double-A minor league baseball team affiliated with the New York Yankees.

2. Old Barracks Museum

A National Historic Landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Old Barracks is a landmark from the Revolutionary War. It documents the Christmas Day that George Washington attacked Hessian troops after crossing the Delaware River.

3. Farmers Market

Trenton's Farmers Market offers a variety of fresh, farm-grown fruits, organic veggies, and meats. You can also find Amish and Eastern European vendors.

4. William Trent House

Home of the late William Trent, this house was once the residence for three governors. Because it has not been renovated much, its foundation has maintained its original appearance and it's easy to see why it is the oldest house in Trenton.

5. The Planetarium

Located inside the New Jersey State Museum, the planetarium has 150 seats where you can sit down and watch laser shows and exhibits of the solar system.

What to do in Trenton

1. At Home In The 1800S

Built as a country estate by its namesake in 1719, the William Trent House, a striking brick building set on 300 acres of property, is surrounded by English cherry trees. During the American Revolution, the home was occupied by Hessian troops who fought in Trenton in 1776. Eventually, the house became a supply depository for the American army. It is also the last eighteenth-century residence known for having slaves. Established as a museum in 1939, the recently renovated home, which showcases artifacts, furniture and paintings from the early 18th century, now provides tours related to Colonial life.

2. 200 Hundred Years Of History

Located in downtown Trenton, the New Jersey State House, which was designed by architect Jonathan Doane and completed in 1792, features a dome covered in 48,000 pieces of gold leaf. Though a fire destroyed much of the original building in 1885, the Governor's Office, Senate and Assembly halls and the courts, as well as most documents, remained intact. The state house showcases a number of works of art, including sixteen murals created by William Brantley Van Ingen, which depict scenes from the Revolutionary War battles of Trenton, Princeton, and Monmouth, as well as the construction, agriculture, glassware and ceramics industries.

3. Giants Among Us

A 42-acre landscaped park, the Grounds for Sculpture, founded in 1992 by John Seward Johnson II, features outdoor large-scale sculpture gardens and indoor exhibition areas that showcase the works of Seward Johnson and artists such as Clement Meadmore, Anthony Caro, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Boaz Vaadia, and George Segal. There is a permanent collection of 270 contemporary sculptures, including representations of Marilyn Monroe, the Venus de Milo and Van Gogh portraits. The park is overrun with spectacular peacocks that stroll amongst the guests.

4. Revisit The Revolution

Housed in the last remaining colonial barracks in New Jersey, the Old Barracks Museum originally sheltered soldiers during the French and Indian War in 1758. In 1902, the Daughters of the Revolution bought a section of the building, and in 1914, the state established a museum on the site. The gallery displays a collection of colonial artifacts and weapons, and offers educational programs for visitors. The institution also hosts Colonial Balls, workshops, walking tours, and even a pub crawl, as well as reenactments of the Battle of Trenton.

5. Serenity In The City Center

The largest and oldest common in Trenton, Cadwalader Park features nearly 100 acres of green space. Designed in 1887 by Frederick Law Olmsted, who also designed Central Park in New York City, the green envelops the Trenton City Museum, a mansion at the center of the park. Visitors are welcome to stroll along the deer paddock, stream, lake and woodlands. The park also honors the fallen of the Civil War with the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, which was erected in 1903.

1. At Home In The 1800S

Built as a country estate by its namesake in 1719, the William Trent House, a striking brick building set on 300 acres of property, is surrounded by English cherry trees. During the American Revolution, the home was occupied by Hessian troops who fought in Trenton in 1776. Eventually, the house became a supply depository for the American army. It is also the last eighteenth-century residence known for having slaves. Established as a museum in 1939, the recently renovated home, which showcases artifacts, furniture and paintings from the early 18th century, now provides tours related to Colonial life.

2. 200 Hundred Years Of History

Located in downtown Trenton, the New Jersey State House, which was designed by architect Jonathan Doane and completed in 1792, features a dome covered in 48,000 pieces of gold leaf. Though a fire destroyed much of the original building in 1885, the Governor's Office, Senate and Assembly halls and the courts, as well as most documents, remained intact. The state house showcases a number of works of art, including sixteen murals created by William Brantley Van Ingen, which depict scenes from the Revolutionary War battles of Trenton, Princeton, and Monmouth, as well as the construction, agriculture, glassware and ceramics industries.

3. Giants Among Us

A 42-acre landscaped park, the Grounds for Sculpture, founded in 1992 by John Seward Johnson II, features outdoor large-scale sculpture gardens and indoor exhibition areas that showcase the works of Seward Johnson and artists such as Clement Meadmore, Anthony Caro, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Boaz Vaadia, and George Segal. There is a permanent collection of 270 contemporary sculptures, including representations of Marilyn Monroe, the Venus de Milo and Van Gogh portraits. The park is overrun with spectacular peacocks that stroll amongst the guests.

4. Revisit The Revolution

Housed in the last remaining colonial barracks in New Jersey, the Old Barracks Museum originally sheltered soldiers during the French and Indian War in 1758. In 1902, the Daughters of the Revolution bought a section of the building, and in 1914, the state established a museum on the site. The gallery displays a collection of colonial artifacts and weapons, and offers educational programs for visitors. The institution also hosts Colonial Balls, workshops, walking tours, and even a pub crawl, as well as reenactments of the Battle of Trenton.

5. Serenity In The City Center

The largest and oldest common in Trenton, Cadwalader Park features nearly 100 acres of green space. Designed in 1887 by Frederick Law Olmsted, who also designed Central Park in New York City, the green envelops the Trenton City Museum, a mansion at the center of the park. Visitors are welcome to stroll along the deer paddock, stream, lake and woodlands. The park also honors the fallen of the Civil War with the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, which was erected in 1903.

Where to Eat in Trenton

Trenton is known for its mixture of Italian-American, Mexican, and Central American communities. Chencha y Chole restaurant is renowned for its Mexican Mole de Pollo. For soul food and live music, have lunch at Thomasena's Restaurant. Or for a spicy dish, visit the 1911 SmokeHouse Bar-B-Que.

When to visit Trenton

Trenton in March
Estimated hotel price
C$ 104
1 night at 3-star hotel
Trenton in March
Estimated hotel price
C$ 104
1 night at 3-star hotel

Tourists tend to stay away from Trenton during the fall and winter, making these the best times to travel. July and August are too hot and humid to go sightseeing but make for great days to go to the beach.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Trenton

Plane

Most folks arrive at the Trenton-Mercer Airport (TTN) in Ewing. You can also land in Newark (EWR) or Philadelphia (PHL) where you can then take a car or train for approximately $18 into Trenton.

Train

If you travel by train, Amtrak, New Jersey Transit, and SEPTA all stop at the Trenton Amtrak Station. The Northeast Corridor rail line accesses most of the major cities in the Northeast. The NJ Transit or SEPTA are both cheaper than Amtrak if you travel from New York City or Philadelphia.

Car

Highway 1 is the major highway that runs through the city. You can take the 1-95 or NJ Route 129 to connect to Highway 1. NJ Route 129 also connects to the New Jersey Turnpike, I-295, and I-195.

Bus

Greyhound Bus has several city connections such as Newark and Camden that connect to Trenton.

Airports near Trenton

Airlines serving Trenton

United Airlines
Good (2,839 reviews)
Lufthansa
Good (2,152 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (4,377 reviews)
KLM
Good (348 reviews)
Air France
Good (399 reviews)
British Airways
Good (1,414 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (3,047 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (1,324 reviews)
SWISS
Good (454 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (1,208 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (958 reviews)
Iberia
Good (915 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (1,413 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (278 reviews)
Etihad Airways
Good (308 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Excellent (320 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (538 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (100 reviews)
Finnair
Good (694 reviews)
LATAM Airlines
Good (777 reviews)
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Where to stay in Trenton

Princeton – the famous university is located a few miles north of Trenton.

Popular Neighborhoods in Trenton

Downtown Trenton – as Mercer County's most visited metropolitan area, Downtown is comprised of many exciting businesses and districts. Artworks, Trenton's visual arts center, is located here and connects the community with art students, professional artists, and Trenton's inner-city and suburban residents.

Marine Terminal Park – located south of Arm & Hammer Park, the land has a public boat ramp that allows people to go fishing in the Delaware River.

Where to stay in popular areas of Trenton

Most booked hotels in Trenton

Quality Inn Near Princeton
Good (7, Good reviews)
C$ 115+
Best Western Bordentown Inn
Good (6.7, Good reviews)
C$ 154+
Red Roof Inn Princeton - Ewing
Okay (5.8, Okay reviews)
C$ 118+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Trenton

Public Transportation

Trenton's surrounding communities all connect to various bus lines that take you to the New Jersey Transit. NJT one-way tickets range from $1.60 - $12.55 depending on what zone you are in. Local buses cost $2.10 for a one-way ticket.

Taxi

Yellow Cab and United Cab Company are two major taxi companies servicing Trenton. Tariffs start at $5.00 plus $2.30 per mile. Some folks prefer to take Uber and Lyft.

Car

Enterprise is the most popular car rental in Trenton. The average car rental cost in Trenton is $25 per day.

The Cost of Living in Trenton

Shopping Streets

Downtown Trenton is the center for shopping, entertainment, and nightlife. You'll also find several stores at the Quaker Bridge Mall in Lawrence Township and at the Capitol Plaza Shopping Mall in Ewing Township.

Groceries and Other

Food Bazaar Supermarket is known for its Latin American, South American, and Caribbean products. Selecto Supermarket has products such as coffee, meats, toiletries, and house products. The average cost of milk is $3.44 per gallon and a dozen eggs are $2.50.

Cheap meal
C$ 16.23
A pair of jeans
C$ 53.12
Single public transport ticket
C$ 2.85
Cappuccino
C$ 5.02
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