Pittsburgh travel guide

Pittsburgh Tourism | Pittsburgh Guide

You're Going to Love Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh is a down to earth, welcoming city that has something for almost everyone.

Part of the attraction lies in Pittsburgh’s culture. With one of the U.S.A.’s largest collections of theater companies, the Three Rivers Film Festival, a world-class symphony orchestra, and a respected ballet company, Pittsburgh is a cultural powerhouse.

But high culture isn’t the only appeal. You can join the masses as they cheer on the Steelers NFL team, take craft brewery tours, dine on mountains of Polish dumplings at superb restaurants like Pierogies Plus, or watch indie bands perform at venues like the Smiling Moose.

To top it off, Pittsburgh is located in a beautiful setting. Located at the point the Allegheny, Ohio, and Monongahela rivers meet, the parks and hills of Pittsburgh offer incredible photo opportunities.

With beauty, culture, and good, honest fun to enjoy, Pittsburgh is a city that’s well worth exploring.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Pittsburgh

1. Watching Sports

Pittsburgh is a sporting city like few others. Watch the Steelers battle it out in the NFL, cheer on the Penguins in the NHL, or the Pirates in the MLB.

2. Craft Beer

In recent years, Pittsburgh has emerged as one of America’s craft brewing capitals. Time your visit to coincide with Craft Beer Week in April and tour famous local breweries like ShuBrew, the East End Brewing Company, and Grist Brew.

3. Festivals

From the Vintage Grand Prix in September to spring’s Folk Festival and summer’s Three Rivers Arts Festival, there’s always something going on in Pittsburgh.

4. Theater

Pittsburgh has a massive array of theater companies, but the Pittsburgh Playhouse is the best known. If you get the chance, don’t miss performances of plays by August Wilson, one of America’s leading modern playwrights and a Pittsburgh native.

5. Multicultural Dining

Food is one of Pittsburgh’s biggest draws. Try the pierogies at Cop Out; Primanti Brothers is the place to go for sandwiches, fries, and coleslaw, while El Burro is a great restaurant for sausage fans.

What to do in Pittsburgh

1. Watch the Steelers

Pittsburgh is a football city, and the Steelers are the city’s pride and joy. Catch a game at Heinz Field while you’re there to experience one of the loudest crowds in the sport.

2. The Andy Warhol Museum

Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, and the famous artist is the subject of one of the city’s most interesting museums. There’s a large collection of his pop art prints and paintings, as well as video installations and talks.

3. Visit the Zoo

Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium offers one of America’s largest collections of wildlife, with over 4,000 animals on display. Highlights include the petting zoo in Kid’s Corner and the zoo’s successful African elephant breeding program.

4. Catch a Show

Whether you love theater, classical music or pop, Pittsburgh is packed with auditoriums and gig venues. Check out the seasonal schedule of the Pittsburgh Playhouse, the Pittsburgh Ballet, and the city’s Symphony Orchestra and arrange a week of cultural delights.

5. Watch the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix

In September, the city hosts its Vintage Grand Prix – a visual feast for lovers of antique cars and a chance to watch thrilling races in Schenley Park.

1. Watch the Steelers

Pittsburgh is a football city, and the Steelers are the city’s pride and joy. Catch a game at Heinz Field while you’re there to experience one of the loudest crowds in the sport.

2. The Andy Warhol Museum

Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, and the famous artist is the subject of one of the city’s most interesting museums. There’s a large collection of his pop art prints and paintings, as well as video installations and talks.

3. Visit the Zoo

Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium offers one of America’s largest collections of wildlife, with over 4,000 animals on display. Highlights include the petting zoo in Kid’s Corner and the zoo’s successful African elephant breeding program.

4. Catch a Show

Whether you love theater, classical music or pop, Pittsburgh is packed with auditoriums and gig venues. Check out the seasonal schedule of the Pittsburgh Playhouse, the Pittsburgh Ballet, and the city’s Symphony Orchestra and arrange a week of cultural delights.

5. Watch the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix

In September, the city hosts its Vintage Grand Prix – a visual feast for lovers of antique cars and a chance to watch thrilling races in Schenley Park.

Where to Eat in Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh has a diverse dining scene, thanks to waves of immigration from the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Russia, and, more recently, Asia and Latin America. The Bloomfield Bridge Tavern is a great place to go for Polish dishes like pierogi, the Hofbräuhaus Pittsburgh serves massive German lagers and sausages, while Meat & Potatoes serves honest American specialities. For up-market gourmet dishes, try popular spots like Nicky’s Thai Kitchen or the bistro at Avenue B, where the seafood and salads are exceptional. Meals tend to cost around $15 for a medium-range meal, up to $50-100 for something more classy.

When to visit Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh in February
Estimated hotel price
C$ 69
1 night at 3-star hotel
Pittsburgh in February
Estimated hotel price
C$ 69
1 night at 3-star hotel

Late summer is definitely the best time to visit Pittsburgh. The heat of July and August gives way to a pleasant warmth in September, and events like the Vintage Grand Prix offer plenty to do. Otherwise, spring is a good alternative (although it can be quite rainy), with major events like the Pittsburgh Folk Festival.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
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How to Get to Pittsburgh

Plane

Most people arrive in Pittsburgh via the city’s International Airport. From there, the best route into town is to take the 28X Airport Flyer bus, which costs $3.75. Fares are paid on the bus, but you’ll need exact change to buy a ticket. There are also a number of car rental outlets at the airport, including Hertz, Alamo, and Avis, and renting a vehicle will cost around $30 a day.

Car

Drivers usually approach Pittsburgh on I-79 (from the west), I-70 (from the south), or I-76 to the north or east. The city is around 5 hours from New York and Washington, and 7 hours from Chicago.

Bus

Greyhound is the major bus operator into Pittsburgh and their services run into a stop at 11th and Liberty in the downtown district. The company provides a wide range of connections, including daily services from Philadelphia and New York.

Megabus is an alternative option, providing low price transportation and stopping at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

Other bus companies serving Pittsburgh include Fullington Trailways (who serve destinations in Pennsylvania and New York State) and Metropolitan Shuttle, who serve local areas.

Airports near Pittsburgh

Airlines serving Pittsburgh

Lufthansa
Good (1,084 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (2,336 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (3,780 reviews)
KLM
Good (264 reviews)
Air France
Good (271 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (950 reviews)
British Airways
Good (766 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (2,558 reviews)
SWISS
Excellent (304 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (851 reviews)
Iberia
Good (549 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (475 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (159 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (585 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (332 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (67 reviews)
Scandinavian Airlines
Good (271 reviews)
Finnair
Good (357 reviews)
Alaska Airlines
Excellent (1,663 reviews)
LOT
Good (216 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh isn’t a huge city (at around 800,000 inhabitants), but it does have a number of different districts to choose from. Some of the best hotels are in the Downtown area. Try the Omni William Penn Hotel for accommodation in a historic property, or the Marriott City Center for an efficient modern option. Student areas like the East End are a good place to find budget accommodation. Try the Shadyside Inn Suites for self-catering apartments or the Quality Inn University Center. But the best views are probably found at South Side hotels like the Morning Glory Inn, a traditional bed & breakfast.

Popular neighbourhoods in Pittsburgh

Downtown – The cultural center of Pittsburgh is also the most convenient place to stay. It’s located on a peninsular called “the Point” and feels like a mini-Manhattan, with its dense towers and cluster of museums and theaters. Check out Toonseum, one of America’s only cartoon museums and beautiful architectural sights like the 19th century Allegheny County Courthouse.

South Side – The place to go for bars and restaurants, South Side is a hilly neighborhood that provides some incredible views of Pittsburgh. It’s not hard to reach, thanks to cute funicular railways like the Duquesne Incline. Head down to Carson Street for the best eateries. The tapas at Mallorca and the desserts at Cheesecake Factory are particularly popular.

East End – Home to Carnegie Mellon University and U. Pittsburgh, the East End is a creative quarter with plenty of bars, restaurants, and stores to explore. It’s a green area, with places to relax like Frick Park and is also home to great attractions like the huge collection of dinosaur skeletons in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Most popular hotel in Pittsburgh by neighborhood

Where to stay in popular areas of Pittsburgh

Most booked hotels in Pittsburgh

Drury Plaza Hotel Pittsburgh Downtown
Excellent (9, Excellent reviews)
C$ 245+
Omni William Penn Hotel
Excellent (8.6, Excellent reviews)
C$ 320+
DoubleTree by Hilton Pittsburgh Airport
Excellent (8.5, Excellent reviews)
C$ 180+
Pittsburgh Airport Marriott
Good (7.9, Good reviews)
C$ 212+
Sheraton Pittsburgh Airport Hotel
Good (7.9, Good reviews)
C$ 183+
Comfort Suites
Good (7.7, Good reviews)
C$ 130+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Pittsburgh

Public Transportation

Pittsburgh’s Port Authority runs an extensive bus network and a small light rail service (which is handy for reaching the sporting venues). Fares are based on “zones”, but most of the time visitors will stick to Zone 1, where the basic fare is $2.50 per journey. There’s also a free fare zone right in the center of town, where all bus travel is completely free of charge.

Taxis

Taxis are an excellent way to get around the city. Basic fares are $3.50 for the meter drop, then $5.30 for every subsequent mile and $28 for every hour of waiting. Uber offers a base fare of $2.50, then $1.55 per mile, so is usually a cost effective alternative.

Car

Pittsburgh’s road network can be off-putting at first, thanks to all the steep valleys and hills that dot the city. Beware of motorists making what look like sudden left turns. It’s a local custom to make left turns immediately when the lights turn green, so don’t get caught out. If you need relatively inexpensive city center parking, the Grant Street Transportation Center at 12th Street and Penn Ave. is a good place to try.

The Cost of Living in Pittsburgh

Shopping Streets

Pittsburgh has a number of lively shopping districts with small independent stores and larger chains jostling for the attention of visitors. South Side is probably the best place to look for fashion bargains. Head to Station Square for apparel stores like Morini and accessory stores like Accentricity. Fifth Avenue Place is a busy mall in Downtown, while in eastern Pittsburgh, the Strip hosts a clutch of contemporary design stores in the 16:62 Design Zone.

Groceries and Other

Finding supermarkets in Pittsburgh is never a problem, and there are plenty of places to buy groceries and other essentials in every part of town. Major chains include Kmart and Walmart but the best places to buy food are smaller places like Weiss Brothers butchers or the Shadyside Market and Deli. The city isn’t too expensive. Expect to pay about $2.65 for 12 eggs and $14 for a good bottle of wine.

Cheap meal
C$ 18.14
A pair of jeans
C$ 51.31
Single public transport ticket
C$ 3.24
Cappuccino
C$ 4.49
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