Sorrento travel guide

Sorrento Tourism | Sorrento Guide

You're Going to Love Sorrento

The resort town of Sorrento is one of the crown jewels of Italy's Amalfi Coast. Drive along dramatic cliffs, enjoy some of the freshest seafood in the world, and experience la dolce vita southern Italian style.

Sorrento, which was founded by the Greeks in 600 BC, is perched atop a scenic cliff on the Bay of Naples. The town was an important trading center in medieval times, and Sorrento's historic harbor still retains much of its maritime flavor. Today, Sorrento's main industry is tourism, with travelers from around the globe coming to enjoy the beautiful weather, relax in the laid-back atmosphere, and taste the region's distinctive liqueur, limoncello.

Sorrento also makes a great base for exploring the many attractions of the Amalfi coast, including the scenic town of Positano, the ancient Greek ruins of Paestum, and the island of Capri, which was a famed hideaway for Roman emperors.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Sorrento

1. Take an Evening Stroll

The Italian tradition of la passeggiata, which is a leisurely evening stroll, is especially appealing in Sorrento, where you can walk through fragrant lemon groves, encounter altars to the Virgin Mary in ancient alleyways, or simply enjoy a refreshing gelato on Sorrento's main promenade.

2. Sample a Limoncello

Lemons are everywhere in Sorrento - locals tend their lemon groves more carefully than they do their children, according to a popular saying - and you can't leave the town without a taste of limoncello, a distinctive liqueur made from lemon rinds, alcohol, and sugar. You can get a sample and a bottle to take home at I Giardini di Cataldo, a lemon grove that is open to the public.

3. Drive along the Amalfi Coast

The winding highway that hugs the Amalfi Coast from Sorrento to Positano is one of the most scenic drives in the world. You can grab a ride on one of the many tour buses that regularly drive the route or, for a more personal experience, hire a taxi for the trip of a lifetime.

4. Visit the Marina Grande

Sorrento's ancient harbor, the Marina Grande, was said to be the haunt of pirates in seafaring times, and the neighborhood still has a a funky vibe all its own with fishermen tending their nets, children playing in the surf, and some of the Amalfi Coast's best seafood restaurants.

5. Take a Day Trip

Sorrento is an ideal base for exploring the Naples region. From there, you can travel to the village of Amalfi to purchase some handmade Majolica tiles, visit the volcanic ruins of Pompeii, or experience the famous Blue Grotto on Capri.

What to do in Sorrento

1. Marina Grande: Picturesque Waterside

While the Amalfi Coast is not such a secret treasure anymore, the Marina of Sorrento has retained its local charm and peaceful qualities. Here, staggering cliffs drop right into the sea, dotted with charming houses. Admire the variety of boats, small and large, and enjoy the comings and goings of fellow vacationers along the pier. The smaller Marina Piccola across town maintains just as much charm, and no matter where you go the cafés will blow your mind.

2. Villa Comunale: Over the Bay

On the way from Marina Grande to Marina Piccola, these public gardens overlook the Bay of Naples in sweeping views. Wander from one perfect bed of flowers to the next, all under the refreshing shade of a diversity of trees. Turn your gaze inland and the infamous Mount Vesuvius stands stoically overlooking the small city. These grounds surround the St. Francis Cloister, well worth a visit, and another lovely café awaits just outside.

3. Museo Correale di Terranova: Quintessential

A true local museum, the Correale is set within a balmy citrus grove that overlooks the majestic and unspoiled Bay of Naples. The gorgeous building was originally a villa home to a prestigious family, complete with a Belvedere terrace and lavish interiors. Beneath chandeliers and among gold-plated decor, the art collection highlights the Neapolitan masters among treasures from all over the country.

4. Pompei: Lava!

The legendary city of Pompeii was destroyed by the eruption of the Vesuvius in the 1st Century, and its eery yet moving remains are a window far into the past. The foundation of this ancient civilization was preserved by volcanic material. The paved streets lead to residences, temples, amphitheaters and even a brothel - identifiable not only thanks to architectural evidence, but also to the casts of perished bodies found within, on display throughout the ruins.

1. Marina Grande: Picturesque Waterside

While the Amalfi Coast is not such a secret treasure anymore, the Marina of Sorrento has retained its local charm and peaceful qualities. Here, staggering cliffs drop right into the sea, dotted with charming houses. Admire the variety of boats, small and large, and enjoy the comings and goings of fellow vacationers along the pier. The smaller Marina Piccola across town maintains just as much charm, and no matter where you go the cafés will blow your mind.

2. Villa Comunale: Over the Bay

On the way from Marina Grande to Marina Piccola, these public gardens overlook the Bay of Naples in sweeping views. Wander from one perfect bed of flowers to the next, all under the refreshing shade of a diversity of trees. Turn your gaze inland and the infamous Mount Vesuvius stands stoically overlooking the small city. These grounds surround the St. Francis Cloister, well worth a visit, and another lovely café awaits just outside.

3. Museo Correale di Terranova: Quintessential

A true local museum, the Correale is set within a balmy citrus grove that overlooks the majestic and unspoiled Bay of Naples. The gorgeous building was originally a villa home to a prestigious family, complete with a Belvedere terrace and lavish interiors. Beneath chandeliers and among gold-plated decor, the art collection highlights the Neapolitan masters among treasures from all over the country.

4. Pompei: Lava!

The legendary city of Pompeii was destroyed by the eruption of the Vesuvius in the 1st Century, and its eery yet moving remains are a window far into the past. The foundation of this ancient civilization was preserved by volcanic material. The paved streets lead to residences, temples, amphitheaters and even a brothel - identifiable not only thanks to architectural evidence, but also to the casts of perished bodies found within, on display throughout the ruins.

Where to Eat in Sorrento

You won't go hungry in Sorrento, where the average price of a meal is around EUR20. For traditional southern Italian cuisine and world-class hospitality, head to La Favorita-O' Parrucchiano on Corso Italia or, if you're looking for a good seafood place, you can eat at Trattoria da Emilia on Via Marina Grande, where the fried seafood is a favorite of actress Sophia Loren. The best way to spend la passeggiata is with a scoop of gelato from Gelateria Davide on Via Giuliani. They serve dozens of homemade flavors, including profumi di Sorrento, which is made from locally grown citrus.

When to visit Sorrento

Sorrento in April
Estimated hotel price
C$ 40
1 night at 3-star hotel
Sorrento in April
Estimated hotel price
C$ 40
1 night at 3-star hotel

Thanks to the warm Mediterranean breezes, Sorrento has wonderful weather throughout the year. However, visiting the town during the height of the summer tourist season is not recommended because of higher hotel rates and the crowds of day trippers that pack the town center. Instead, visit during the spring or fall. The weather is still warm, and you won't be jostling for elbow room during la passeggiata.

Data provided by weatherbase
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Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
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How to Get to Sorrento

Plane

Most international visitors to Sorrento will arrive via Naples International Airport (NAP), which is 33 miles north of Sorrento. If you are heading directly to Sorrento from the airport, take a shuttle bus operated by Curreri Viaggi Coach Service. The tickets cost EUR10 and you'll be treated to beautiful views of Mount Vesuvius and the Amalfi Coast on your drive.

Train

The Circumvesuviana train runs between downtown Naples and Sorrento every 30 minutes. Tickets cost EUR3.30, and they are sold at train stations, newsstands, and tobacco shops.

Car

Sorrento is easily accessible by car via the Naples-Salerno autostrada. Get off the highway at the Castellammare exit and then follow the signs to Sorrento. There are taxis that will take you to Sorrento, but be advised that they can be very expensive, costing up to EUR40 for a 10-mile trip.

Bus

There is a local bus system that runs between the towns on the Amalfi Coast. Tickets are sold in time increments beginning at EUR2.20 for 45 minutes.

Airports near Sorrento

Airlines serving Sorrento

United Airlines
Good (2,838 reviews)
Lufthansa
Good (2,152 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (4,377 reviews)
KLM
Good (348 reviews)
Air France
Good (399 reviews)
British Airways
Good (1,414 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (3,047 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (1,324 reviews)
SWISS
Good (454 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (1,206 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (958 reviews)
Iberia
Good (915 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (1,413 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (278 reviews)
Etihad Airways
Good (308 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (538 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (100 reviews)
Finnair
Good (694 reviews)
LATAM Airlines
Good (777 reviews)
Ryanair
Good (1,671 reviews)
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Where to stay in Sorrento

Piazza Tasso - Sorrento's town square embodies southern Italy's unhurried charms with quaint shops, fruit stands selling locally grown lemons, and authentic Italian eateries. Enjoy an evening stroll with the locals or simply sit and watch the time pass in the Mediterranean sunshine.

Popular Neighborhoods in Sorrento

Marina Grande - Sorrento's ancient harbor still has loads of seafaring charm. Meander among the brightly painted fishing boats, chat with the friendly locals, and enjoy freshly caught seafood in one of the neighborhood's eateries.

Where to stay in popular areas of Sorrento

Most booked hotels in Sorrento

Continental
Excellent (9.1, Excellent reviews)
C$ 199+
Grand Hotel Angiolieri
Excellent (9.1, Excellent reviews)
C$ 262+
Grand Hotel Aminta
Excellent (9, Excellent reviews)
C$ 174+
Vhome
Excellent (8.9, Excellent reviews)
C$ 76+
Hotel Prestige
Excellent (8.8, Excellent reviews)
C$ 135+
Hotel Mega Mare
Excellent (8.5, Excellent reviews)
C$ 65+
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How to Get Around Sorrento

Public Transportation

The red and orange EAV buses run five routes in Sorrento. The tickets cost EUR1.20 and must be purchased in advance at the bus station or tobacco shops.

Taxi

Taxis are widely available in Sorrento with the going rate of EUR10 for a trip from Piazza Tasso to Marina Grande. Most taxis also include a EUR4 surcharge for each piece of luggage.

Car

If you are brave enough to navigate Sorrento's narrow, winding streets then a rental car is an affordable option. Sorrento has offices from international companies like Avis, Budget, and Hertz. The prices range from EUR6.68 for an economy car to EUR44.86 for a luxury SUV. There is quite a bit of parking in Sorrento compared to other towns, but it isn't free. The cost is EUR2 per hour or EUR24 per day.

Car rental agencies in Sorrento

Hertz

Hertz
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The Cost of Living in Sorrento

Shopping Streets

The Piazza Tasso is Sorrento's main shopping street. There you will be able to purchase souvenirs like bottles of limoncello, handmade leather, and Virgin Mary tchotchkes. The Corso Italia offers a variety of high-end fashion boutiques and shoe stores. Sorrento is a tourist town, so the prices, especially for limoncello, are a bit higher than what you would find in the rest of Italy.

Groceries and Other

There are two American-style supermarkets in the Piazza Tasso neighborhood, Supermercato Pollio on the Via degli Aranci and Standa on Corso Italia. You'll pay around EUR5 for milk, EUR2 for a loaf of bread, and EUR3 for eggs.

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